“Give Me Liberty Or Give Me Death!”

“Give Me Liberty Or Give Me Death!”

“Give Me Liberty Or Give Me Death!”

To avoid the possible interference from then Lieutenant-Governor Dunmore and his Royal Marines, the Second Virginia Convention met back on March 20, 1775 inland at Richmond–in what is presnrly referred to as St. John’s Church–instead of what was then the Capitol in Williamsburg. The delegate Patrick Henry presented a variety of resolutions to raise and bring forth a militia, and to put Virginia in a posture of self defense. Henry’s opponents of course urged caution and patience until the English crown replied to Congress’ latest petition for reconciliation.

On the 23rd of the month, Patrick Henry presented a proposal to organize a volunteer company of cavalry or infantry in every Virginia county. An account and start of what Virginia would later do again in its near future. By custom, Henry addressed himself to the Convention’s President, Peyton Randolph of Williamsburg, VA. Henry’s words were not transcribed but thankfully due to his word being ever so eloquent were never forgotten, or Henry’s closing words: “Give me liberty, or give me death!”

Henry’s first biographer, William Wirt of Maryland, was three-years-old in 1775. An assistant federal prosecutor in Aaron Burr’s trial for treason at Richmond in 1807, and later attorney general of the United States, Wirt began to collect materials for the biography in 1808, nine years after Henry’s death. From the recollections of men like Thomas Jefferson, Wirt reconstructed an account of Henry’s life, including the remarks presented below.

St. John’s Church, Richmond, Virginia
March 23, 1775.

MR. PRESIDENT: No man thinks more highly than I do of the patriotism, as well as abilities, of the very worthy gentlemen who have just addressed the House. But different men often see the same subject in different lights; and, therefore, I hope it will not be thought disrespectful to those gentlemen if, entertaining as I do, opinions of a character very opposite to theirs, I shall speak forth my sentiments freely, and without reserve. This is no time for ceremony. The question before the House is one of awful moment to this country. For my own part, I consider it as nothing less than a question of freedom or slavery; and in proportion to the magnitude of the subject ought to be the freedom of the debate. It is only in this way that we can hope to arrive at truth, and fulfil the great responsibility which we hold to God and our country. Should I keep back my opinions at such a time, through fear of giving offence, I should consider myself as guilty of treason towards my country, and of an act of disloyalty toward the majesty of heaven, which I revere above all earthly kings.

Mr. President, it is natural to man to indulge in the illusions of hope. We are apt to shut our eyes against a painful truth, and listen to the song of that siren till she transforms us into beasts. Is this the part of wise men, engaged in a great and arduous struggle for liberty? Are we disposed to be of the number of those who, having eyes, see not, and, having ears, hear not, the things which so nearly concern their temporal salvation? For my part, whatever anguish of spirit it may cost, I am willing to know the whole truth; to know the worst, and to provide for it.

I have but one lamp by which my feet are guided; and that is the lamp of experience. I know of no way of judging of the future but by the past. And judging by the past, I wish to know what there has been in the conduct of the British ministry for the last ten years, to justify those hopes with which gentlemen have been pleased to solace themselves, and the House? Is it that insidious smile with which our petition has been lately received? Trust it not, sir; it will prove a snare to your feet. Suffer not yourselves to be betrayed with a kiss. Ask yourselves how this gracious reception of our petition comports with these war-like preparations which cover our waters and darken our land. Are fleets and armies necessary to a work of love and reconciliation? Have we shown ourselves so unwilling to be reconciled, that force must be called in to win back our love? Let us not deceive ourselves, sir. These are the implements of war and subjugation; the last arguments to which kings resort. I ask, gentlemen, sir, what means this martial array, if its purpose be not to force us to submission? Can gentlemen assign any other possible motive for it? Has Great Britain any enemy, in this quarter of the world, to call for all this accumulation of navies and armies? No, sir, she has none. They are meant for us; they can be meant for no other. They are sent over to bind and rivet upon us those chains which the British ministry have been so long forging. And what have we to oppose to them? Shall we try argument? Sir, we have been trying that for the last ten years. Have we anything new to offer upon the subject? Nothing. We have held the subject up in every light of which it is capable; but it has been all in vain. Shall we resort to entreaty and humble supplication? What terms shall we find which have not been already exhausted? Let us not, I beseech you, sir, deceive ourselves. Sir, we have done everything that could be done, to avert the storm which is now coming on. We have petitioned; we have remonstrated; we have supplicated; we have prostrated ourselves before the throne, and have implored its interposition to arrest the tyrannical hands of the ministry and Parliament. Our petitions have been slighted; our remonstrances have produced additional violence and insult; our supplications have been disregarded; and we have been spurned, with contempt, from the foot of the throne. In vain, after these things, may we indulge the fond hope of peace and reconciliation. There is no longer any room for hope. If we wish to be free² if we mean to preserve inviolate those inestimable privileges for which we have been so long contending²if we mean not basely to abandon the noble struggle in which we have been so long engaged, and which we have pledged ourselves never to abandon until the glorious object of our contest shall be obtained, we must fight! I repeat it, sir, we must fight! An appeal to arms and to the God of Hosts is all that is left us!

They tell us, sir, that we are weak; unable to cope with so formidable an adversary. But when shall we be stronger? Will it be the next week, or the next year? Will it be when we are totally disarmed, and when a British guard shall be stationed in every house? Shall we gather strength by irresolution and inaction? Shall we acquire the means of effectual resistance, by lying supinely on our backs, and hugging the delusive phantom of hope, until our enemies shall have bound us hand and foot? Sir, we are not weak if we make a proper use of those means which the God of nature hath placed in our power. Three millions of people, armed in the holy cause of liberty, and in such a country as that which we possess, are invincible by any force which our enemy can send against us. Besides, sir, we shall not fight our battles alone. There is a just God who presides over the destinies of nations; and who will raise up friends to fight our battles for us. The battle, sir, is not to the strong alone; it is to the vigilant, the active, the brave. Besides, sir, we have no election. If we were base enough to desire it, it is now too late to retire from the contest. There is no retreat but in submission and slavery! Our chains are forged! Their clanking may be heard on the plains of Boston! The war is inevitable²and let it come! I repeat it, sir, let it come.

It is in vain, sir, to extenuate the matter. Gentlemen may cry, Peace, Peace²but there is no peace. The war is actually begun! The next gale that sweeps from the north will bring to our ears the clash of resounding arms! Our brethren are already in the field! Why stand we here idle? What is it that gentlemen wish? What would they have? Is life so dear, or peace so sweet, as to be purchased at the price of chains and slavery? Forbid it, Almighty God! I know not what course others may take; but as for me, give me liberty or give me death!

Patrick Henry may not have had a coin displaying his all too familiar words of Patriotism but if he had it would have been this coin.

US Army Give Me Liberty Or Give Me Death 1775 Coin

 

The power tradition of American Freedoms has never lost its luster and will forever hold sway over those who would take away the birthright of Americans.

Give Me Liberty Or Give Me Death


Source: Wirt, William. Sketches of the Life and Character of Patrick Henry . (Philadelphia) 1836, as reproduced in The World’s Great Speeches, Lewis Copeland and Lawrence W. Lamm, eds., (New York) 1973.

91 yr old WW2 Veteran visits the General Patton Museum

91 yr old WW2 Veteran visits the General Patton Museum

US Army Veteran Pfc Ernest Frost turned 91 this March and I (his grandson) made plans to fly him to Chiriaco Summit where the General George Patton Museum resides for a walk down memory lane- World War 2 style.

The museum was founded in 1988 to commemorate General Patton and the tank training base camp he forge in the southern deserts of California for they resembled the terrain of North Africa where they soon would be deploying.

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Pfc. Ernie Frost stands next to Gen Patton’s bust and portrait.  He served under Patton in the 7th Army, 3rd Infantry Division.

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Grandpa tells me about the types of rifles he used during the war.

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Being a scout his main weapon was a 1903 Springfield Sniper rifle having over 20 confirm kills.

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Various games and products from the era celebrating the Battle of the Bulge.

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The updated bazooka.  Grandpa had a much smaller version.

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P08 and P38 Walther pistols.

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Looking at the Nazi Luftwaffe helmet along with may other he remembers putting holes in them with his rifle;)

He had many stories of Junker JUs and BF109 pilots strafing them from above.  HE said the sound they made when the aircraft began to dive on them was unforgettable.

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The BAR Browning Automatic Rifle.  Had fired in training but never used in combat.

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Lugar P08 9mm. Grandpa got one of these off a dead German soldier.

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Grandpa said they drove one of these around Strasbourg after curfew with a 50 cal to take out any lights that weren’t supposed to be on.  Martial Law was in effect and the Germans were told to follow the rules or get there asses kicked.

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Didn’t take long for museum manager, Mike Pierson, to notice grandpa wearing his US Army uniform from 1945.

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Pfc Ernie Frost points out the Bronze Star award which he received for his actions during the Colmar Pocket Campaign.

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Nazi dress uniform daggers and stilettos.  The German Army definitely loved their blades.

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Walking through the outdoor portion of the museum he reflects on memories of engaging these metal monsters.  Once he was asked by his Lt. to take a bazooka and attack a Tiger tank wedged in an intersection.  The guns we still able to rotate so grandpa quickly instructed the the Lt to go do it himself if thinks he can.  He knew it was a suicide mission to try to attack a Tiger tank with one of our old bazookas.  Not a chance.

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After the museum manager, Mike Pierson, discovered grandpa he quickly included him in the presentation for the patrons that afternoon.

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He asked him questions and described all the decorations on his uniform.

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Grandpa was enjoying all of his attention and discussion about his participation in the greatest conflict of all time with the one of the greatest Americans in history!

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Learn more about this WW2 hero at this link.  US Army Pfc Ernest Frost.

US Army Infantryman 11B Coin

A Few Funny Army Memes

A Few Funny Army Memes

You really cannot go through a day without witnessing at least one or two funny military memes. There are companies out there that make it a practice to use these memes often within a Facebook page to set off some deliberate fight or way to get members of different military branches to take aim at each other in a fun and interesting way. Often they are successful because the bantering between branches never ends in this all too familiar competition of who is in the best branch within the United States military.

It doesn’t end cause 1. We love competition. 2. We love to win. And 3. We are Americans so it’s our god given right to bitch, complain moan, caste bricks in glass houses, and throw a storm in the general direction of a brother or sister military branch not to mention it can be find and you might just learn a thing or two.

So let’s start off with a few US Army memes!

The Japs Are Coming For Us

Well the Japanese have go to take this one!

Milatary Women

Maybe 4 centuries ago. but you have got to give them a hand for their uniformity.

Intense Army Training

If we can only find a bottle rocket and laucnh this guy into oribit like we used to around July 4th.

Life In Army

Join The Army They Said

Nothing. I have nothinbg cause I have been there.

The Greek Army

300? Man have the times changed.

Every Army Needs A Battle Cry

Every Army needs a battle cry!

You signed on the line. Here ya go!

Why Don’t Americans Wear the Liberty Cap?

Why Don’t Americans Wear the Liberty Cap?

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Why Don’t Americans Wear the Liberty Cap? Learn to celebrate your independence from British Royalty and Banking tyranny by donning your “Liberty Cap”!  The identifiable symbol for many revolutions and was the key symbol in the US Army featured here.  It was prominently associated with rebellion.

This Christmas Santa Clause also Wears the Liberty Cap!

Good ol’ St Nick is also known for sporting a Red Liberty Cap.  The Original Santa Claus comes from the Siberian Shamans that use the Amenita Muscaria, a Large red fat mushroom with white polka dots.  During these periods of winter the shaman would bring these magic mushrooms to the snowed in Scandanavians.  Cabin fever was easily abated with the visions of gum drops dancing in their heads.

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Bill Murray donning the Red Liberty Cap in “Life Aquatic”

Its probable the French Revolutionaries got it from the American Revolutionaries who lead the revolt against the brutal military and banking tyranny of the British Empire and Vatican Hegemony.  In 1776, the Americans had had enough and in the ancient tradition of the Phyrgian Slaves donned Liberty Caps to represent the American Revolution with the British Royal Empire and The Holy Roman Empire!

This is a brimless, relaxed, cone shaped hat fitting the head.  Originally worn by the peoples of Phyrigia a region known as Anatolia in ancient history.  Today his region is called Asia Minor.  In 1593 Cesare Ripa wrote the book Iconologia recognizing these caps and there history.  The Phyrigian cap was worn by slaves of ancient Rome and Greece.  Later it was worn The Liberty Cap Seal of the US Senate.for ceremonial purposes.  The cap also played a part in the ceremony of the manumission slave.  Its connection to Asia Minor is tenuous.  The understanding is that the Phyrgian slaves who when freed ould again wear their traditional head wear.  Whichever it may be, the Phrygian cap was adopted and symbolised liberty to the libertarians during the Enlightenment.  The “Phrygian cap” , French for “bonnet Phrygian“,  is generally displayed as a red cap, “bonnet rouge” or Liberty Cap, “bonnet de la Liberte“.

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The Liberty Cap represents SOVEREIGNTY which means that nobody other than God is your RULER.  Sover (Super) in Latin means Above.  Reign is to Rule Over.  Or Above Rule.  Above any one else’s Ruler-ship or Monarchy.  In the American colonies the Liberty Cap was pervasive in promoting the the rebellion from Britain and birthing of a new nation under God and no other.  The Sons of Liberty in 1765 was the first annotation.  Later during the American Revolution some soldiers wore knitted red stocking caps with the occasional stitched words “LIBERTY” or “Liberty or Death” along the brim.  This style was imbued in the attire of “Jonathan” an allegorical figure of the New England tale.

Liberty Caps were generally atop a Liberty Pole during the American Revolutionary War as a symbol of Freedom.  Perhaps it was the “Dangling Carrot” ever chasing what is just out of our reach for it seems we have yet to achieve true Liberty from the evil doers of the British Royal Empire and their Banking Regime.  Many coins have the Liberty Cap positioned a loft a pole or hovering behind the head of Lady Liberty where the Limbic brain or the part of the Brain that processes the Care principle.  If we don’t care enough we will not stand up to the tyranny upon us!  On the right we also see it on the seal of the United States Senate supplanting the fasci in the center.  Very powerful symbology here.

Seal_of_New_York.svgA golden Liberty Cap appears on the seal of the State of New York the original capital of the United States of America.  The latin phrase beneath translates to “The Figure of Liberty Proper”.  Her hair is is unkempt and adorn with pearls, azure gown, sandals, cincture around the waist, fringed gules, a mantle of the last depending from the shoulders behind the feet, the dexter hand a staff adorned by a Phrygian Cap Or, a sinister arm holding and supporting the shield of the dexter chief point, a Royal Crown by her sinister foot rejected.

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A Liberty Cap also appears on the state flags of New Jersey and West Virginia.  It is predominant on the US Army Seal!  Also painted on many murals within the US Capital in Washington D.C. like the Apotheosis of George Washington and artifacts with the same for Benjamin Franklin.

liberty-cap-us-capital     Imacon Color Scanner

Life, Liberty And Pursuit Of All Who Threaten It Shirt

Life, Liberty And Pursuit Of All Who Threaten It Shirt

The figure here is detailed in the painting “Telegraph” in the US Senate by Constantine Brumidi personifying America wearing a Liberty Cap.  However the Liberty Cap is commonly associated with the revolution of the Americas from Great Britain it not shown worn.  Its either an isolated symbol or on top of a Liberty Pole or shaft.  The one here shows it colored as an American Flag.  Another shows it on a pole crossing a fasces.  This design is from an envelope during the American Civil War.  It was to be featured in the painting in the US Capital authorized in 1855 called the ‘Freedom triumphant in War and Peace” but was rejected by Jefferson Davis , then the Secretary of War, and demanded a Roman helmet be used in its place.

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The Liberty Caps around the world

La Liberté guidant le peupleDuring the American Revolution the only European country to aid was France.  The Liberty Cap was also used by the French Revolution that lead to teh beheading of the Royals!  I guess someone wanted some heads to roll;)  The French Revolutionary Army donned the Liberty Cap as seen here in this illustration of a Marienne.  It was documented in 1789 but hte cap became popular in the Spring of 1790.  It was worn by the Liberty Goddesses and Nation prior and became a part of the uniform of the sans-culottes.  King Louis XVI, on June 20th 1792, donned a Liberty Cap when pressed by a large crowd that had stormed the palace of Tuileries. Later the Liberty Cap was placed on the mitre of the fleeing Archbishop of Paris.

By 1793, members of the Assemblies of Paris were obligated to wear a Liberty Cap and accepted it as a national symbol placing it on the French Seal of the State of the Republic and to replace the Fleur-di-lis on milestones. The cap was definitely considered an important icon.  Here is a postcard with a large red Liberty Cap portrayed.  It is identified with more extreme revolutionaries and as been subdued during periods of stability when the French Government discouraged any uprising or disturbing the apple cart.  Under the Consulate regime the capped Liberty was replaced by a less provoking Minerva helmet as well as ALL public monuments.  Take a clue!

Pictured here is a painting called “La Liberte guidant le peuple” – Liberty Guiding the People, by Eugene Delacroix and is currently hanging in the Louvre in Paris.  Here Lady Liberty is brandishing the French tricolore Flag and wearing a red Phrygian Liberty Cap.  Inspired by the insurrection of July 1830 in Paris ending the last king of France, Charles X, forcing him to abdicate and was replaced with the “King of the French” Louis-Phillippe.

During the 2nd Republic, rebellions caused the provisory government to add a Liberty Cap on the white stripe of the French tricolore Flag in February 1848.  Then the cap disappeared again from the flag and the seal then was reestablished as a national symbol during the 3rd Republic.

The liberty cap continues to be worn by Marianne, the female illustration of the French Republic; however solely generally. Her bust, that adorns town halls of France, generally sports a rather less revolutionary jeweled headdress. She wears a awfully discreet cap on the new French brand shown higher than.

       The French National Motto              

100 Franc coin of 1989. Note the Phrygian cap as well as the motto.

A cap is visible on the 1989 one hundred monetary unit coin shown on the proper. till 2002 the cap appeared, in conjunction with the Cross of French region, on the brand of a rightist French organisation referred to as Rassemblement pour la République (RPR), the neo-Gaullist party of Jacques Chirac. the brand isn’t any longer used, maybe attributable to the pardonable tendency to ascertain it as as a unshapely parrot. (The parot’s “eye” is truly a blue, white and red decoration.)

Other Countries

Elsewhere, the Liberty cap was incorporated into the image of the late eighteenth century Irish revolutionary movement called the Society of the United Irishmen. It additionally carried over to occupant revolutions of the decennium. The cap appeared on Mexican coins through the late nineteenth century into the middle twentieth century (including the previous eight Reales coin). Today, it’s featured of the coats of arms, national flags or seals of Central American country, Central American country, Colombia, Republic of Paraguay and Cuba. In Argentina it seems not solely on the national arms and flag, however additionally those of the military and navy, on presidential flags and therefore the flags of provinces together with Corrientes, Jujuy, Mendoza and urban center. As within the US, the cap invariably appears to feature on high of a stick, instead of people’s heads.

The Phrygian Cap before it became a Liberty Cap

Before the Phrygian cap came to symbolise freedom or revolutionary fervour, it had another message within the west. it had been an emblem related to the east. so it appears to own been worn by arange of peoples within the Balkans and peninsula. Macedonian, Thracian, and Dacian military helmets all had forward inform tiptop maybe mimicking Phrygian caps.

        

The Phrygian cap may be seen on Trajan’s Column, worn by the Dacians, and on the Arch of Septimius Severus, worn by the Parthians. Roman poets routinely used the term “Phrygian” to mean Trojan. In Greek art, the Phrygian cap served to spot Paris as a Trojan – and then positively not a correct Greek. The mosaic on the correct shows mythical being sporting a Phrygian hat. The cap additionally seems on murals in an exceedingly fourth century Thracian topographic point at Kazanlak in fashionable Bulgaria.

The Phrygian cap was worn by the god Mithras – shown on the correct. He was a Saviour god within the adherent Persian tradition supported the Zoroastrian faith.Mithras was a forerunner of the Saviour-god Hebrew United Nations agency borrowed Mithras’s halo, his birthday and his temple on the Vatican Hill in Rome, however not his Phrygian hat. identical headgear conjointly options on the heads of the 3 Magi in previous depictions of them – marking them as being from the east, like this depiction (above left) from a church in pitched battle. The name Magi denotes Zoroastrian clergymen from Persia.

Liberty Cap Mountain Peak

Liberty Cap is a granite dome in Yosemite parkland, California, USA that lies at the northwestern margin of the Yosemite park. It lies adjacent, to the north of American State Fall,  on the naturalist path. It rises 1,700 feet (520 m) feet from the bottom of American state Fall to a peak elevation of 7,080 ft (2,158 m). A smaller, mesa-like dome referred to as Mount Broderick stands forthwith adjacent to cap.

Liberty Cap in Coins

Liberty Cap – Head Facing Left (1793)

Circulated

Uncirculated

Liberty Cap – Large Head Right Facing (1794)

Circulated

Uncirculated

Liberty Cap – Sm. Head Right Facing (1795-1797)

Circulated

Uncirculated

American Legend Paul Bunyan wore the Red Liberty Cap representing the freedom of the new frontier!

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A Salute to My Father Uncles and Grandfathers on Veterans Day

A Salute to My Father Uncles and Grandfathers on Veterans Day

A Salute to My Father Uncles and Grandfathers on Veterans Day

Though I have not personally served in the military, I humbly reached the rank of  Eagle Scout as a youth.  As a child and well into adulthood, grew up in the company of military heroes who have shared their stories of sacrifice, insights, memorabilia and instilled in me an immeasurable respect for the fighting men and women of this great country.
 
My family’s lineage dates back to the 2nd Mayflower’s voyage to the new world that we now know as the United States of America. His heritage includes a considerable share of Iroquois Indian blood and extensive history of defending freedom that begins with the French-Indian and Revolutionary War and includes every call-to-arms to date.
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US Revolutionary War

US Revolutionary War- General Washington Crossing the Delaware

 
I have a great appreciation for all of the efforts his family has contributed to the military which has resulted in allowing all Americans, including myself, the opportunity to attend college, care for our families, and strive for our American Dream.
Needless to say, I was drawn to create military designs and have been doing so for over 20 years. At Vision-Strike-Wear.Com Im lucky to be creating amazing, unique and dare I say, “bad-ass” designs for the military.
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VSW asked me  to share my family’s military lineage.  Below is list of my known ancestors both past and present who have served…

A Salute to My Father, Uncle and Grandfathers on Veterans Day

Military Service on Frost Call’s Mother’s side include:

A Salute to My Father Uncles and Grandfathers on Veterans Day begins with my Great Grandfather, Paul Jerome Denning, served in the Army with the 28th Division 112th Infantry, American Expeditionary Force during World War I.
A Salute to My Father Uncles and Grandfathers on Veterans Day

Army Sergeant Paul Jerome Denning

Served with 28th Division 112th Infantry American Expeditionary Force in World War I

Enlisted August 5, 1917 and Honorably Discharged on May 8, 1919

Enlisted in Co. C 16th Pennsylvania Infantry National Guard in Bradford, PA. and was later trasferred to Company B in Oil City, PA. Had basic training in Augusta, GA. Later was attached to battalion headquarters of the 112th Infantry and was promoted to sergeant of scouts. Known as the “Keystone Division”, the 28th and Sgt Denning participated in the following engagements during World War I.

5th German Offensive, July 14th – July 27, 1918
Advance on Oureq and Vesle, July 28 – September 7, 1918
Chateau Thurry and Marne Valley
Meuse-Argonne Offensive, September 26th – October 7, 1918
Thiaucourt Sector, October 15th – November 11, 1918

The division suffered 2,531 battle deaths, 13,746 wounded and 726 captured by the enemy.

Awards and Citations

Distinguished Service Cross
3 Bravery citations
Victory Medal
My Grandfather, David Foyle England, served in the 1st Marine Division in Guadalcanal, Cape Gloucester and Peleliu in the Asiatic-Pacific Theater during World War II.
 A Salute to My Father Uncles and Grandfathers on Veterans Day

Marine Corps Sgt David Foyle England

Served with 1st Marine Division Asiatic-Pacific Theater World War II
Enlisted January 6th, 1942 and Honorably Discharged on January 24th, 1946

Enlisted in Stockton, NY one month after Pearl Harbor and joined the hard-boiled grunts of the 1st Marine Division. After a grueling 2 months on Guatalcanal eating mullet and rice he contracted malaria. Later as Bomb Disposal Technician, Sgt, England received 2 field commissions for performing duties at great risk to himself disarming all types of unexploded ordnance for both United States and Japanese forces during operations against the enemy on Cape Gloucester, New Britain, handling dangerously sensitive fuses under enemy fire and again in Peleliu Island Palau Group. He volunteered with great risk to his life on many occasions clearing enemy mine fields as well as disposing of numerous unexploded bombs and projectiles most of which were in a highly sensitive condition with no prior knowledge of enemy weaponry.
Guadalcanal, November 11th, 1942 – January 5th, 1943
Cape Gloucester, New Britain, December 26th, 1943 – March 1st, 1944
Peleliu, Palua Group, September 15th, 1944 – October 14th, 1944
Awards and Citations 
Presidential Unit Citation w/ Star
Asiatic Pacific Ribbon w/ 3 Stars
Good Conduct Medal

Military Service on Frost Call’s Father’s side include:

My father, Donald Raymond Frost, served in the Navy as an Aviation Machinists Mate, 2nd Class from 1966 to 1970. His service with the Patrol Squadron 44 took him to the North Atlantic Ocean, Norwegian, and North Sea during the Cold War against the Soviet Union.
A Salute to My Father Uncles and Grandfathers on Veterans Day

Navy Aviation Machinist’s Mate 2nd Class Donald Ray Frost

Served with Patrol Squadron 44 in the North Atlantic Ocean, Norwegian, and North Sea during Cold War operations against the Soviet Union Enlisted January 18th 1966 and Honorably Discharged on January 17th 1970 After enlisting, he quickly shipped out to the Navy Great Lakes Training Center in Great Lakes, IL for 2 and half months of boot camp. Afterwards he completed 6 months of “A” School training in NAS Memphis, TN to learn how to maintenance and repair aircraft. After completing his training he was sent to duty station Patrol Squdron 44, ASW, P3A, B Orion’s, NAX Pax River, MD. His deployment stations throughout the North Atlantic and Baltics engaged primarily in maritime patrol, reconnaissance, anti-surface warfare and anti-submarine warfare with P-3 Orions and other aircraft against Soviet submarine and surface ships for the next 2 years in the brutal Arctic circle.
NAS Keflavik, Iceland
Boda, Norway
Copenhagen, Denmark
Azores Islands
 
My Uncle, Dan Ernest Frost (his father’s brother), who served in the 1st Air Cavalry as an Army Specialist Five during the Vietnam war.
A Salute to My Father Uncles and Grandfathers on Veterans Day

Army Specialist Five Dan Ernest Frost

Awards and CitationsArmy Combat Infantry Badge
Army Bronze Star with Cluster
Purple Heart
Air Medal
Army Commendation Medal
Army Good Conduct Medal
Vietnamese Cross of Gallantry (Unit Award)
Republic of Vietnam Campaign Medal
Vietnam Service Medal
Presidential Unit Citation with Cluster
Army Meritorious Unit Commendation
Rifle Markemanship Badge
My Grandfather, Ernest Raymond Frost (on his father’s side), who served with the 3rd Division “Cotton Balers” 7th Army European Theater during World War II from Naples, Southern France, Battle of the Bulge, The Rhine, Colmar Pocket Campaign and Strasbourg, Germany.

A Salute to My Father Uncles and Grandfathers on Veterans Day

Army Private First Class Ernest Raymond Frost

Served with 3rd Division 7th Army European Theater World War II

Enlisted December 17th 1943 and Honorably Discharged on January 31st 1946

On March 25, 1943 he was drafted in the United States Army. He received his basic training in Camp Croft, South Carolina for 17 weeks. He was shipped out with the famous 7th Infantry 3rd Division to Europe. There he saw combat in Italy, France, and Germany from 1944-1945. He participated in the Battle of the Bulge, The Valley of Purple Hearts and many small skirmishes along the way primarily as a scout and sniper. He received the Bronze Star and a Purple Heart with clusters from two wounds received from mortar fire and an anti-tank shell as well as the French Croix de Guerre with palm.

ARDENNES * RHINELAND * CENTRAL EUROPE 1944 – 1945

Wounded France January 25th 1945 and January 30th 1945

Awards and Citations

Bronze Star
Purple Heart with cluster
French Croix de Guerre with palm
Presidential Unit Citation
Good Conduct Medal
American Campaign Medal
Army Good Conduct Medal
European-African-Middle East Medal WW II
Victory Medal WW II
Combat Infantry Badge
Fourrageres

Numerous video interviews of Ernest Raymond Frost are available on our site. Listen to his first-hand accounts of his military experience during World War II.

Lineage from Frost Calls’ Grandmother, Musette Cobb Frost, wife of Ernest R. Frost:

His Great Uncle, Donald C. Cobb, (his Grandmother Musette’s Brother) was killed in action near the French/Belgium border in 1944.

Army Private First Class Donald C. Cobb

Killed in Action French/Belgium Border 1944

His Great Uncle, Morris Cobb, (his Grandmother Musette’s Younger Brother) served in the U.S. Air Force as Airman Second Class.

Frost Call’s family military lineage dates back to the Revolutionary and French Indian Wars.

Below is a copy of the original Calvary Certification issued for Samuel Richey, a family lineage linked through Frost Call’s Grandmother, Musette (Cobb) Frost’s family.

It states the date of enlistment and specific wars that Samuel Richey (Richie) participated in during the Civil War from 1864 to 1865.

In addition, it is noted that Samuel Richey’s Great Grandfather Richey served under Captain George Washington during both the French Indian Wars (1754 to 1763) and the Revolutionary War (1775 to 1783).

Samuel Richey’s Grandfather also served as Captain in the War of 1812.

Samuel’s brother, Benjamin Richey served for a term of three years in the Civil War under served in COC Reg. 115th Ohio Infantry.

Andrew Gardner, Greatgrandfather of Mrs. Richey, Samuel Richey’s wife, served as Captain of Morgan Riflemen, which served as General Washington’s Body Guard.

Frost Call’s Grandmother, Musette Cobb Frost, is a descendant of Samuel Richey by way of his youngest daughter, Blanche, his Great Grandmother.
Richey Muster Sheet
Below is a closer look at the text inscribed in the above document:
CALVARY
THIS IS TO CERTIFY
THAT
SAMUEL RICHEY (RICHIE)
Enlisted from Alleheny County, State of Pennsylvania, September 9, 1864 and was mustered into the United States Service at Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania as a Private to server for a term of one year or spring during the war under Captain Guy Bryan and Col. T.F. Rodenbaughm.  Company A 18th Regiment Pennsylvania Voluntary Calvary.
The Regiment was attached to Calvary Brigade Army of the Shenandoah and Comrade Richey participated in the following engagements:
* Battle of Opequon Winchester, September 19, 1864 near to Cedarville September 20th,
* Frank Royal September 21st,
* Fishers Hill September 22nd,
* Milford September 22nd,
* Waynesboro September, Near Brock Gap October 6th,
* Toms Brook October 8th & 9th, 1864,
* Cedar Creek November 11th, Newton November 12th,
* Mount Jackson November 22, 1864,
* Expedition to Lacy Springs December 19th to 22nd,
* Duty Winchester till May 1865,
* Scout to Edenburg March 17th to 19th, 1865

The regiment was on duty at Cumberland, Maryland till June 1865. He was honorably discharged June 13th, 1865 at Cumberland, Maryland by reason of close of war.

Memo of Gen. Griffin, Post G.H.R.  No. 207, Homestead, Pennsylvania. Samuel Richey, Great grandfather of Comrade Richey served during Revolutionary War also in French and Indian Wars under Captain George Washington. Samuel Richey, Grandfather of Comrade Richey, served as Captain in the War of 1812 with distinction.
Samuel, father of Comrade Richey, enlisted in COC 24th Ohio Infantry and re-enlisted as a veteran for three years.
Benjamin, brother, served in COC Reg. 115th Ohio Infantry and served for a term of three years.
Andrew Gardner, Greatgrandfather of Mrs. Richey, served in Revolutionary War, as Captain of Morgan’s Riflemen, which served as General Washington’s body guard.
Presented by Comrade Richey to his wife Ella and children: James, Samuel, Ella, George, Stella and Blanche.

We were certainly amazed at how well Frost Call has maintained a close tie to his family’s impressive military lineage dating so far back in American history.